PoE Splitter/Adapter of choice to power IR illuminator?

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Most poe cams I've seen so far have a 12v coax jack also which you can use instead of poe to power the cam. So get a 12v coax Y cord with one plug and 2 jacks, plug it into that power separator and plug the cam and light into the 2 jacks
 

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Thanks for the reply, I've ordered the Y cable and I'll give it a try when it arrives next Monday or Tuesday. Based on what you said, it sounds like the IR and the camera will get their power from the Y cable barrel connectors and network traffic will continue to go through the RJ45 connector.
 

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Didn't I say that somewhere on age #1?
heh, yeah you did, but maybe not concisely or clearly enough for them to 'get it', in particular, it was apparent they didn't get that the camera should be on 12V and not PoE.

My first student job was an "Explainer" at an experimental hands-on science museum known as the Exploratorium, and my wife is a retired technical writer in the electronic design automation (chip design) industry. so I've had it drilled in me to put myself in the reader's seat when considering how to explain something.
 

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I wanted to give everyone an update on this set up that I was using.

I've run into an issue where using the active POE splitter will power the IR illuminator, but not the camera. When I first hooked it up, I was able to get the camera and I are illuminator powered but I did notice I was dropping packets to the camera when I did a persistent ping. Shortly after that the camera lost power. I'm not sure exactly why this is happening, the IR illuminator requires 4W and the camera requires 8.5 W, so I don't think I'm overloading the splitter.

Any thoughts on what might be happening or things for me to try would be greatly appreciated.
 

biggen

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I wanted to give everyone an update on this set up that I was using.

I've run into an issue where using the active POE splitter will power the IR illuminator, but not the camera. When I first hooked it up, I was able to get the camera and I are illuminator powered but I did notice I was dropping packets to the camera when I did a persistent ping. Shortly after that the camera lost power. I'm not sure exactly why this is happening, the IR illuminator requires 4W and the camera requires 8.5 W, so I don't think I'm overloading the splitter.

Any thoughts on what might be happening or things for me to try would be greatly appreciated.
802.3.af only allows ~12w total output on each switch port. So you are at the limit between both devices.

Run a dedicated ethernet cable for the IR.
 

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802.3.af only allows ~12w total output on each switch port. So you are at the limit between both devices.

Run a dedicated ethernet cable for the IR.
Thanks @biggen, if the illuminator is not on, the camera should have enough power, right?
 

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Yup, no problem with that scenario.
Well, everything is still connected but the IR light is not on since it's daylight. The camera is still not getting power. Maybe there is something wrong with the barrel connection between the splitter and the camera.
 

biggen

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Well, everything is still connected but the IR light is not on since it's daylight. The camera is still not getting power. Maybe there is something wrong with the barrel connection between the splitter and the camera.
I'd check the switch port first. Do you have another PoE device that you can plug into the port and check if its working?
 

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Here are some things to consider which assumes a lot which I call BASE 1.

POE: If you are using a name brand POE Switch the output will be reflective of the written specifications. If however this is just some 3rd tier AliExpress special YMMV!

Ethernet: If you’re using real certified CAT-6 23 AWG solid pure copper wiring instead of 24, 26, CCA etc. This Ethernet drop should be dedicated to a single hardware device and the wire should have been tested for throughput, bandwidth, voltage drop / resistance. Never mind the correct CAT-6 RJ45 connector which is properly sealed and lubed with dielectric grease.

Splitters: Is this splitter using a minimum of 16 / 18 AWG wiring instead of the common 24 / 26 AWG?!? As this will increase the voltage drop and resistance.

Active Splitter: Again what type of wire is in use never mind the electronics inside. Which surely is causing a voltage drop due to higher resistance.

IR / Camera: You won’t know the REAL power consumption until you measure each one on a short run! It doesn’t matter what the manual says because it’s made to a dollar value that isn’t going to solid in meeting a energy consumption target.

All of the things stated up top is BASE 1. Now if I was there the first thing I would do is measure everything so you know what the BASE lines are in that specific environment. Go to the POE switch and measure the output on that port is it in fact providing X volts?!? If not that port is damaged assuming all others show a different voltage reading. Keep in mind just because you measure the correct voltage doesn’t mean it’s fine. As every rookie will fall prey to not measuring the actual current (amperage) that port can actually provide!

This is exactly like anyone who measured a car battery and sees the expected voltage. Guess what happens when you place a real load on the battery?!? The battery fails to provide the correct amount of current / ampacity to do any work!

Next, let’s assume you have no clue or don’t have the tools to measure current on the line. No worries just move to another port and see what happens assuming the PSU isn’t damaged.

Moving down grab the longest 100 - 200 FT (REAL 23 AWG solid copper) cable and connect one single item like the camera. Let it run for an hour than cover the IR so it comes on if it runs fine - move on.

Disconnect the camera and wire up only the Active splitter let it run for an hour. If the camera runs fine connect the IR.

Dollars to donuts you will see a massive voltage drop at the end that is no where close to 12 VDC. Which still means nothing because the current is probably nil.

In the industry we are not allowed to use any type of splitter or active splitter in a commercial installation. As the vast majority do not conform to any UL / cUL testing of conformity. It also introduces another failure point and fire hazard in a enclosed space! Regardless of that if you see a POE splitter that indicates GB support and costs at least $25.XX and above you’re more likely to receive a piece of hardware that has the BASE 1 of wiring size, efficiency, and throughput.

Anything else it’s a gamble because there’s no such thing as a $4.XX active splitter that isn’t using the cheapest materials and ultra thin wiring inside causing all kinds of voltage drop!

Take some measurements with a known length of wire and note the voltage drop with each part added one at a time. Then repeat the same with the current installation in place. This is why when people use 24 AWG instead of 23 AWG solid copper wire adding low quality parts causes endless headaches because the BASE 1 isn’t even present to start with.

Or famously the wire is there but everything else is a cascade of low quality parts with endless high resistance (thin cable) low efficiency, to splitting a single Ethernet cable into 2-3-4-6?!?

I see and read this everyday and just mark the calendar as to when a failure will appear or a fire will ensue!

Good Luck . . .
 

Rickoo

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Here are some things to consider which assumes a lot which I call BASE 1.

POE: If you are using a name brand POE Switch the output will be reflective of the written specifications. If however this is just some 3rd tier AliExpress special YMMV!

Ethernet: If you’re using real certified CAT-6 23 AWG solid pure copper wiring instead of 24, 26, CCA etc. This Ethernet drop should be dedicated to a single hardware device and the wire should have been tested for throughput, bandwidth, voltage drop / resistance. Never mind the correct CAT-6 RJ45 connector which is properly sealed and lubed with dielectric grease.

Splitters: Is this splitter using a minimum of 16 / 18 AWG wiring instead of the common 24 / 26 AWG?!? As this will increase the voltage drop and resistance.

Active Splitter: Again what type of wire is in use never mind the electronics inside. Which surely is causing a voltage drop due to higher resistance.

IR / Camera: You won’t know the REAL power consumption until you measure each one on a short run! It doesn’t matter what the manual says because it’s made to a dollar value that isn’t going to solid in meeting a energy consumption target.

All of the things stated up top is BASE 1. Now if I was there the first thing I would do is measure everything so you know what the BASE lines are in that specific environment. Go to the POE switch and measure the output on that port is it in fact providing X volts?!? If not that port is damaged assuming all others show a different voltage reading. Keep in mind just because you measure the correct voltage doesn’t mean it’s fine. As every rookie will fall prey to not measuring the actual current (amperage) that port can actually provide!

This is exactly like anyone who measured a car battery and sees the expected voltage. Guess what happens when you place a real load on the battery?!? The battery fails to provide the correct amount of current / ampacity to do any work!

Next, let’s assume you have no clue or don’t have the tools to measure current on the line. No worries just move to another port and see what happens assuming the PSU isn’t damaged.

Moving down grab the longest 100 - 200 FT (REAL 23 AWG solid copper) cable and connect one single item like the camera. Let it run for an hour than cover the IR so it comes on if it runs fine - move on.

Disconnect the camera and wire up only the Active splitter let it run for an hour. If the camera runs fine connect the IR.

Dollars to donuts you will see a massive voltage drop at the end that is no where close to 12 VDC. Which still means nothing because the current is probably nil.

In the industry we are not allowed to use any type of splitter or active splitter in a commercial installation. As the vast majority do not conform to any UL / cUL testing of conformity. It also introduces another failure point and fire hazard in a enclosed space! Regardless of that if you see a POE splitter that indicates GB support and costs at least $25.XX and above you’re more likely to receive a piece of hardware that has the BASE 1 of wiring size, efficiency, and throughput.

Anything else it’s a gamble because there’s no such thing as a $4.XX active splitter that isn’t using the cheapest materials and ultra thin wiring inside causing all kinds of voltage drop!

Take some measurements with a known length of wire and note the voltage drop with each part added one at a time. Then repeat the same with the current installation in place. This is why when people use 24 AWG instead of 23 AWG solid copper wire adding low quality parts causes endless headaches because the BASE 1 isn’t even present to start with.

Or famously the wire is there but everything else is a cascade of low quality parts with endless high resistance (thin cable) low efficiency, to splitting a single Ethernet cable into 2-3-4-6?!?


I see and read this everyday and just mark the calendar as to when a failure will appear or a fire will ensue!


Good Luck . . .
Truly a novice here, and really didn't take the time to measure anything but....

I've not had very good luck with the cheapo splitters powering IR lighting and audio mics. They work for a while until they don't. Became tired of troubleshooting issues when things stopped working. Decided to buy a small dedicated power supply like this:


and some connectors like these:


Spent the time to run Cat6 between them and have had zero issues since. Probably would be a better choice for wire, but these ran outside/below ground and I had some direct burial wire handy so that's what I used.
 

Teken

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Truly a novice here, and really didn't take the time to measure anything but....

I've not had very good luck with the cheapo splitters powering IR lighting and audio mics. They work for a while until they don't. Became tired of troubleshooting issues when things stopped working. Decided to buy a small dedicated power supply like this:


and some connectors like these:


Spent the time to run Cat6 between them and have had zero issues since. Probably would be a better choice for wire, but these ran outside/below ground and I had some direct burial wire handy so that's what I used.
To be clear my comments are not targeted to anyone simply offering insight and guidance. Having said this your experience is like many others but guess what?!?

As in life we learn from our experiences, mistakes, and build upon them for success. Now, what you did is exactly the evolution of what happens every day around the world.

But I would offer the following in hopes your next iteration will be implemented when it’s time. The vast majority of people here are the DIY type that like to get their hands dirty and work the system. This gives critical insight as to how things interconnect and the ability to trouble shoot if required.

The problem that comes along is buying and using accessories and products not safety rated.

Now . . .

I’m not talking about the famous CE mark used by every Chinese maker in the world!

In North America we adhere to UL / cUL, ETL, and so on. Other safety and certification are applied to all manner of electronics. None of this guarantees something won’t break or is going to offer less than stellar performance. But it will tell you it has been tested and meets the bare minimum of standards as it pertains to electrical safety & containment.

The PSU you linked does not indicate any such certification or safety markings. If we go to BASE 1 check the power cord to see if it has any known safety listings?!?

If it doesn’t by default be aware this most basic cable is not using the correct material that pertains to heat dissipation, VOC emissions, temperature range, and current carrying ability.

If we move on to the PSU itself it should proudly display a FCC, CE, CCC logo. This means this device complies and meets the bare (legal) standards as it pertains to RFI, EMI, emissions. If it doesn’t this means you have opened your home to a high possibility of noise and interference.

This is manifested by seeing LED light flicker, noise on AM / FM, WiFi dropping out to reduced range. Those who use any form of home automation from Z-Wave, ZigBee, Insteon, X-10, BLE will have issues.

At the end of the day name brand hardware is cheaper than years before in large part to Chinese competition! So buying a Altronix et all is doable and less likely to cause you BASE 1 issues.

Cheers
 
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