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saltwater

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We've moved into our new house and I've got cat cables running everywhere. Three months on and I went about drilling a hole in the ceiling to connect a WAP, number 4, a job I'd been putting off for a while. Thank god for those snake cameras, attached it to a tablet and instantly knew which direction to fish out the cable, it was about 4 inches to one side. Pulled the cable out, terminated it and ran the tester over it, green lights from 1 to 8, what a relief. Those pass-through RJ45's are a god-send, certainly made the job a lot easier. For the entire house I didn't have to re-terminate any cables, feel like a pro now.
20210104_133448_HDR.jpg
 

SJGUSMC21

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Good for you! I hate tipping cable...never liked doing it. And honestly, sucked at it as well. I was lucky as well, not one of my cables had a bad tip when I was done being an Attic Monkey a few months back.....well done!
 

David L

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We've moved into our new house and I've got cat cables running everywhere. Three months on and I went about drilling a hole in the ceiling to connect a WAP, number 4, a job I'd been putting off for a while. Thank god for those snake cameras, attached it to a tablet and instantly knew which direction to fish out the cable, it was about 4 inches to one side. Pulled the cable out, terminated it and ran the tester over it, green lights from 1 to 8, what a relief. Those pass-through RJ45's are a god-send, certainly made the job a lot easier. For the entire house I didn't have to re-terminate any cables, feel like a pro now.
View attachment 78823
I have been terminating cable since my Teens. I am an old Telephone/Cabling Guy... The Pass Through's came out due to CAT6 needs the twist all the way to the end of the connector. I have worked with CAT1 (yes almost zero twist), CAT3, CAT5, CAT5e, CAT6, but not CAT7 or 8 yet. I am Semi-Retired :) But still terminate everyone's cable runs for them, family/friends. There were days I/we would terminate a 1000 cables (both ends patch panel to jack/block) in a day. Anyway, so for anyone reading this and running CAT6 cable, be sure to use these connectors and bring the twist all the way to the end:

1609765635119.png1609765556906.png


I am Old School, I personally don't like these connectors. Butting up the cable inside a connector with final crimp, in my opinion, is a better termination. Maybe I am wrong but cutting the cable after a crimp I just am not comfortable with, it may be fine as long as the crimp is tight. But I will use these for CAT6, there is no way I could bring the twist to the end without these connectors...

When buying your connectors be aware there are different types:

Stranded
Solid
Shielded
Un-Shielded

1609767174802.png
On this note, we have found using a Solid Connector when you have Stranded Cable will not crimp properly and visa versa. You usually can tell by looking into the connector and seeing square holes or round holes where the wires go. Plus some connectors, depending on the manufacture, will have a smoky tint to tell the difference...


Also when making up Patch Cables, these Boots are easy to add:


1609766741823.png

HTH
 

Jessie.slimer

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I have been terminating cable since my Teens. I am an old Telephone/Cabling Guy... The Pass Through's came out due to CAT6 needs the twist all the way to the end of the connector. I have worked with CAT1 (yes almost zero twist), CAT3, CAT5, CAT5e, CAT6, but not CAT7 or 8 yet. I am Semi-Retired :) But still terminate everyone's cable runs for them, family/friends. There were days I/we would terminate a 1000 cables (both ends patch panel to jack/block) in a day. Anyway, so for anyone reading this and running CAT6 cable, be sure to use these connectors and bring the twist all the way to the end:

View attachment 78831View attachment 78830


I am Old School, I personally don't like these connectors. Butting up the cable inside a connector with final crimp, in my opinion, is a better termination. Maybe I am wrong but cutting the cable after a crimp I just am not comfortable with, it may be fine as long as the crimp is tight. But I will use these for CAT6, there is no way I could bring the twist to the end without these connectors...

When buying your connectors be aware there are different types:

Stranded
Solid
Shielded
Un-Shielded

View attachment 78833
On this note, we have found using a Solid Connector when you have Stranded Cable will not crimp properly and visa versa. You usually can tell by looking into the connector and seeing square holes or round holes where the wires go. Plus some connectors, depending on the manufacture, will have a smoky tint to tell the difference...


Also when making up Patch Cables, these Boots are easy to add:


View attachment 78832

HTH
Have you tried the monoprice 2pc plugs with the inserts? Wondering how you pros like that style, as thats what I've been using, though the feed through style like you posted looks even easier.
 

DsineR

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Careful with the pass-thru RJ45s, do NOT crimp then cut unless you are using a great pair of flush cuts.
If not flush, the wires can stick out past the RJ45 and cause problems when connected.
Recommend cutting the excess cable from the RJ45, then pull back the cable slightly into the RJ45 & crimp.
 

looney2ns

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David L

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Have you tried the monoprice 2pc plugs with the inserts? Wondering how you pros like that style, as thats what I've been using, though the feed through style like you posted looks even easier.
I have not. I like it but when you terminate 100's of cables this looks like it would slow us down. BUT it is very interesting, looks solid for a termination. I would say it would be good for home terminations or small office.

I like his jacket trick to separate the wires...But again, it would slow me down...What am I saying, being Semi-Retired I am already being slowed down :)

 

David L

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I have been an AMP Crimper guy :) But love Klein Tools, they have served me well over the years. I have had several dozen pairs of their snips over the years...These things can cut a quarter in half...:)


Over time I ended up with these after cutting/striping cable all day: (I recommend everyone have a pair of these in their Tool Collection)

 

David L

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I've been terminating RJ connectors for 30 or 40 years now, well into the upper thousands or more by now, and still prefer the dead front connector and my old, trusty, AMP crimper. I may try the pass through one of these days, my hands aren't what they once were.
Yeah I still use one of these older AMPs

1609788661316.png1609788761632.png1609788800297.png1609788828871.png

I actually have used all kinds of crimpers over the years, but these heavy, very well made AMPs are still with me...
 

Mike A.

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I have not. I like it but when you terminate 100's of cables this looks like it would slow us down. BUT it is very interesting, looks solid for a termination. I would say it would be good for home terminations or small office.
^ This. Former phone and network guy too (among other things). I hate those two-piece things. Pain in the ass and much slower for me. Much rather use the standard butt-type or pass-throughs.
 

saltwater

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I have not. I like it but when you terminate 100's of cables this looks like it would slow us down. BUT it is very interesting, looks solid for a termination. I would say it would be good for home terminations or small office.

I like his jacket trick to separate the wires...But again, it would slow me down...What am I saying, being Semi-Retired I am already being slowed down :)
Damn good tip about the jacket to separate the wires; that's certainly in the memory bank now.

Never knew of those two-piece jacks and I reckon I could have worked with them.

Before I started my house build, I ordered my tools and non-pass-through jacks and practiced. My thoughts were, this is going to take me ages, there must be a better way. So I went back to the University of You Tube and came across the pass-through style.
 

Jessie.slimer

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^ This. Former phone and network guy too (among other things). I hate those two-piece things. Pain in the ass and much slower for me. Much rather use the standard butt-type or pass-throughs.
Yeah, it is definitely slower, so if you are doing it for a living I can see how you wouldn't want to use them.

I guess they are made for hobbyist guys like me who can take a several minutes to set one up.
 

Mike A.

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Yeah, it is definitely slower, so if you are doing it for a living I can see how you wouldn't want to use them.

I guess they are made for hobbyist guys like me who can take a several minutes to set one up.
Some seem to like them. To me it's just another little unnecessary piece to keep track of and you have to look to see which way it's turned, feed things through the tiny holes in the insert, etc. By the time that I fiddle with and look at it that much I could be done with the others.

The key with all of them really is to get your wires laid out well. Straight, aligned, right length, with good clean square cuts. Once you do it enough you get the technique down and they'll slip right into whatever. If your cuts are kind of knuckled under and/or to the side and/or wires still kinked from the twist and/or laid over then much harder to get right going in,
 

saltwater

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Some seem to like them. To me it's just another little unnecessary piece to keep track of and you have to look to see which way it's turned, feed things through the tiny holes in the insert, etc. By the time that I fiddle with and look at it that much I could be done with the others.

The key with all of them really is to get your wires laid out well. Straight, aligned, right length, with good clean square cuts. Once you do it enough you get the technique down and they'll slip right into whatever. If your cuts are kind of knuckled under and/or to the side and/or wires still kinked from the twist and/or laid over then much harder to get right going in,
I found that after getting the wires in order, cutting them at an angle, with the white/green (A) the longest and the brown the shortest made for an easier insert into the jack. It felt like as soon as the first wire was in its slot, the second wire had nowhere to go other than the second slot, and so on.
 

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I found that after getting the wires in order, cutting them at an angle, with the white/green (A) the longest and the brown the shortest made for an easier insert into the jack. It felt like as soon as the first wire was in its slot, the second wire had nowhere to go other than the second slot, and so on.
Whatever works for you. If that makes it easier, then go with it. Really meant more the cut at the end of each of the wires and getting that all the same and clean/square. A slight angle as you lay them out isn't critical. But if you don't have a good tool and it bends the end a little off and some will cut individual wires and they all then go in different directions... good luck. lol

Hard to describe how something feels, but to me when I'm on a roll and doing it right, other than ordering them, I'm not thinking much about individual wires at all. I'm doing it all more as a unit and the whole thing just slides in together.
 
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My big "trick" has always been to take off about two inches of jacket then slide the jacket back about a half inch. Then order the wires maintaining twist, trim with a flush cutter and insert into the connector. By sliding the jacket back like that it gives an extra half inch of exposed wire to hold and keep things aligned. After the wires are seated flush at the front of the connector, just slide the jacket back into the connector to get the crimp lug onto the jacket. Very few failures or problems doing it that way, for the last 30 or so years.
 

David L

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Damn good tip about the jacket to separate the wires; that's certainly in the memory bank now.

Never knew of those two-piece jacks and I reckon I could have worked with them.

Before I started my house build, I ordered my tools and non-pass-through jacks and practiced. My thoughts were, this is going to take me ages, there must be a better way. So I went back to the University of You Tube and came across the pass-through style.
You did good. As DsineR said you have to watch out on these. With regular modules you are pushing/butting the cable/wires up in the connector so when you Crimp normally there is no movement of the wires, it is different with pass-throughs, we actually crimp then cut because when you crimp, the wires that stick out does/can move back in the connecter which could be a miss-term (What we use to call them) :) As long as you push the cable/jacket all the way in the connector it will usually keep the wires from moving much during the crimp. All of this really depends on your crimper, we have always had problems with cheap crimpers, even cheap modules/connectors. Our green hands use to buy cheap tools and always caused us problems. We finally had to stop that and buy them their tools and deduct it from their pay. Most of us were Contractors... Several jobs we use to do, the customer/client would require Panduit...They were definitely the best back then but also very expensive...
 
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