Hikvision PoE NVR and PoE Illuminators (Or 12v)

CmdrBond

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High, I have a Hikvision DS-7108-SN/P PoE NVR and 4 DS-2CD2132F-IS 2.8mm domes.

I've finally got round to playing with the settings regarding night vision, and am getting terrible IR bleed. Possibly due to reflection.

So bad, I've actually turned off the IR on each camera.

I don't really want to run more power (or cables at all, if I can help it) so am looking to see if I can find any PoE IR or White Light Illuminators.

So far, I've found GJD Clarius using 802.3at, and Raytec Vario 2 using 802.3af (same as my NVR I believe).

Is it possible to split the Cat5 so that 1 cable could power both the light and camera? Would it have the power to do so?

Alternatively, is this actually possible? Can I run a 12v item from the DC jack on the camera?
I found it while searching other things.
Powering a Hik 2032 bullet with 48V PoE, I get 12V OUT on the cam's 12V power plug.
IE, the cam itself is acting as a 12V pass-through. Dunno what sort of load it could handle, tho.
If that is possible, then it may bell be the simplest solution.
 

pozzello

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check the foam rings on each cam and make sure they are in good shape and properly pressed up against the inside of the glass dome.

you might measure 12v on the power input port, but you probably cannot draw any significant current. you might
power a microphone, but i wouldn't count on reliably powering an external IR illuminator from it...
 

tigerwillow1

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I have modified several Dahua and one Hikvision camera model to provide power out of the 12 volt input connector. All of them have a diode on the 12 volt input line that must be bypassed to get power out. A 12 volt reading from the power input connector is likely being read with a high impedance meter. There's no useful power available there and any load will pull it down to zero volts. The easiest way to power an external IR light is to use a POE splitter. You do have to keep the total power consumption down to what the POE port can provide. Even though the camera with its IR light off probably draws under 5 watts, many of them always turn the IR lights on during bootup, so the POE port needs to be able to power the internal IR lights even if you have them shut off (unless your camera doesn't cycle the IR lights at boot time). There are a number of threads you can search for to get more info.
 

CmdrBond

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Thanks.

Looks like 12v out of the camera is a no go - not really a surprise.

Having looked a little closer, only the i2 (8W IR) and w2 (9W white) are 802.3af compatible.

VARIO 2 PoE

The rest are AT due to power consumption.

But that's ok, I only need close range...

Would 9 Watts be too much to share with a camera? It would save running a full length of cable from the NVR

I considered the PoE splitters, but don't they stop the power continuing to the camera?

I've got 4 unused ports on the NVR, I suppose I could just run more cable from that.

Or just run a separate 12v feed from somewhere else.
 

CmdrBond

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Further to the above, I've found that the power consumption of my camera is 5W (7W with ICR on)

So question 1.

Is the ICR "ON" during the day, or at night?

If it's on at night, how much power do the IR LEDs draw?

As 5 + 9 watts is, I think ok.

But 7 + 9 Watts is pushing it.
 

tedrpi

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I have modified several Dahua and one Hikvision camera model to provide power out of the 12 volt input connector. All of them have a diode on the 12 volt input line that must be bypassed to get power out. A 12 volt reading from the power input connector is likely being read with a high impedance meter. There's no useful power available there and any load will pull it down to zero volts. The easiest way to power an external IR light is to use a POE splitter. You do have to keep the total power consumption down to what the POE port can provide. Even though the camera with its IR light off probably draws under 5 watts, many of them always turn the IR lights on during bootup, so the POE port needs to be able to power the internal IR lights even if you have them shut off (unless your camera doesn't cycle the IR lights at boot time). There are a number of threads you can search for to get more info.
Any chance you can share pictures an detials of the modification you did? I have an older hikvision I'm willing to sacrifice to try this out. Is it just a matter of soldering a jumper around the surface mount diode?
 
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You can use a PoE spliter on the camera cable. From that you need a "Y" cable to split the 12VDC feed for both the camera and the IR illuminator. The limitation is the PoE power limitation of the port supplying the camera. Keep in mind that these splitters generally have optimistic specs and may not work well under full, advertised, loading.

Y Cable

PoE Splitter
 

tedrpi

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Something like this would be ideal, there's not much extra space in a PFA137 junction box, but they cost ~$60.

POE-MSPLT-4812P

I also jsut wanted to tinker and see if the diode solution could work.
 

tigerwillow1

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