Network poe switches

The Automation Guy

Getting comfortable
Joined
Feb 7, 2019
Messages
859
Reaction score
1,520
Location
USA
I think most would say a dual NIC system is easier than setting up VLANs.
There is no question that a dual NIC is easier to set up - although it isn't "plug and play" either.

That's not to say that VLANs are hard to set up, but they do require a little bit of knowledge (that is easily found in internet how-to guides and Youtube). I am a regular guy who knows little about IT and I self-taught myself all of this stuff. If someone is capable enough to set up a BI system, they are capable enough to have this same type of home network setup.
 

wittaj

IPCT Contributor
Joined
Apr 28, 2019
Messages
14,738
Reaction score
27,347
Location
USA
Before I figured out what I was going to do, I watched and reviewed this thread:


Now this member did a lot of setup to make it easier, but it still involved quite a bit even with the tools and downloads he created.

Then I looked at the Dual NIC thread:


And decided that Dual NIC was the simpler option, plus it keeps all the camera data off of a VLAN router/switch.

The Edgerouter is rated at like 800Mbps and my cameras are around 350Mbps so I thought it was crazy to have almost half the capacity used just on that.

I simply ordered a $10 GB NIC, opened up the computer and popped it in an available slot. Turned the computer back on and assigned it an IP address in the range I was going to assign my cameras to. Way more plug and play than a VLAN switch.

You have to static IP the cameras anyway, so static IP the NIC was just as simple.

As always, YMMV and use case and experience may vary and dictate something else.
 

Nunofya

Getting the hang of it
Joined
Nov 8, 2021
Messages
177
Reaction score
81
Location
USA
Take an available port on the POE switch and plug it into the 2nd NIC in the BI computer and pull the video feeds from the NVR that way. Or if the NVR has two WAN/LAN ports, use one of those to connect to BI computer.
I don't have any of the cameras plugged directly into the NVR. It goes: Cameras--16-port poe switch---8-port switch. TP-Link router (in AP mode) is plugged into the 8-port switch along with the BI computer and NVR. TP-link wan port (don't know if that's right) is plugged into a T-Mobile 5g home internet router.

Be nice if I could do the pictures, lol
 

jrbeddow

Getting comfortable
Joined
Oct 26, 2021
Messages
259
Reaction score
340
Location
USA
Dual NIC is way easier in another sense not yet mentioned: sure, used enterprise grade 24-48 port switches are available on Ebay for very reasonable prices, agreed. However, I would suggest caution on many of these if you care about two other things: one is wasted idle power usage, as many of these draw 40-50 watts or more just sitting there plugged in, before even adding the draw from the cameras. The other is factoring in the rather loud fans that most of the big enterprise switches use: do you have a space where this will be installed that will isolate off that constant noise source?
My advice is to use fanless, generally unmanaged switches, but to each his own.
 

The Automation Guy

Getting comfortable
Joined
Feb 7, 2019
Messages
859
Reaction score
1,520
Location
USA
Dual NIC is way easier in another sense not yet mentioned: sure, used enterprise grade 24-48 port switches are available on Ebay for very reasonable prices, agreed. However, I would suggest caution on many of these if you care about two other things: one is wasted idle power usage, as many of these draw 40-50 watts or more just sitting there plugged in, before even adding the draw from the cameras. The other is factoring in the rather loud fans that most of the big enterprise switches use: do you have a space where this will be installed that will isolate off that constant noise source?
My advice is to use fanless, generally unmanaged switches, but to each his own.
Power consumption is definitely a consideration. However if someone (like the OP) needs 4 small switches just for their cameras (he didn't mention how much other capacity he needs, but it's probably larger than zero which means even more switches) is their total power consumption really going to be less than a single large switch? Obviously it's hard to speculate, but it's not so cut and dry and it's not hard to believe that 4 or 5 small switches might draw nearly the same 40-50 watt at idle that a large switch does.

PS - I hope my posts don't come off as argumentative. They are not intended to be so. There are no right or wrong ways of handling this. Just different options and opinions.
 

samplenhold

Known around here
Joined
Aug 8, 2018
Messages
5,385
Reaction score
17,460
Location
Spring, Texas
When I first began this foray into the IP cam world, I knew basic info about IT networks but I could in no way be called an expert. I had set up my home LAN years ago with a basic Netgear switch in my old house. When we moved to the new house I needed more switch so I bought a larger Netgear switch. Then I got into the IP Cam obsession and needed a POE switch.

With all of the talk about managed switches, I bought a 16 port Netgear managed POE switch with 8 POE ports and 8 standard ports because there was no WAY I would have more than 8 cams, right?

Then I saw the thread about isolating your cams from the internet and don't get hacked. So I looked into the dual NIC vs. VLANs issue. It seemed to me at the time that VLANs seemed complicated, especially compared to the dual NIC method. I just did not want to have to learn anything new at the time. So I bought a NIC PCI card for $31.40 and installed it. My office PC already had a dual NIC motherboard so I had no issue being able to have both machines on the same sub-nets.

Then I "needed" more cams, much more than 8. But I did not buy them all at the same time. They just sort of replicated or something. Plus I found it easier to place two of the new POE switches closer to the cams and then use the pre-existing, installed ethernet jacks in the house to route that traffic to the IT closet. Then somehow I got roped into LPR and definitely needed yet another POE switch.

I am happy with how things progressed and like having multiple POE switches and multiple views of each area. If a switch goes down I have the cams distributed over multiple switches in such a way that each area is covered even if a switch fails.

@The Automation Guy is correct that in the discussion of Dual NIC vs VLANs there is no right or wrong answer. Either way, if done correctly, you are isolating the cams from the internet but you can still view things from outside your home. That is the goal. It is up to the individual to decide what is appropriate for themselves. We can only give our OPINIONS.

Now I will say that over the few years I have been on here, I have seen treads of folks using VLANs that have had some issues and trying to trouble shoot problems with VLANs. I have never seen someone with an issue of having to trouble shoot a Dual NIC. Also for me, it seems like I do not need to change/set up network connections very often. So if I was using VLANs I would probably have to relearn things all over again.
 
Joined
Dec 28, 2019
Messages
11,475
Reaction score
27,383
Location
New Jersey
In the interest of KISS, not the band, I went with a second NIC for the cameras. Actually it's a four port gig NIC. That way I can split the switches, currently two, onto two separate NICs if I want and still have room for more. No danger of overloading the NICs or network and good isolation from the internet without any of the management needed for VLANs.
 

Flintstone61

Known around here
Joined
Feb 4, 2020
Messages
4,685
Reaction score
7,367
Location
Minnesota USA
My TP-link NIC card arrived today. and a small TP-link 5 port desktop switch (NON -Poe) Because Sometimes I'm screwing with other PC's amd Cams and Routers, and I'm always running into the other room disconnectiing shit. and climbing under the desk and move the ethernet from one device to another....
Then I wonder why I can't login in to my Friggin NVR's :)
 
Joined
Dec 28, 2019
Messages
11,475
Reaction score
27,383
Location
New Jersey
My switches sit right above my desk. Even that close I keep a six foot patch cable plugged into the main network switch and one of the PoE switches just so I have quick easy access to either one without even fumbling for a cable. All the cables are harnessed in place so it's not a rats nest and it's easy to see what's going on. Plus I like the blinking lights :rofl:
 
Last edited:
Top