IR Illuminator in existing flood light fixture (R30 bulb, E26 base, 120VAC)

ccb056

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I'm not a fan of the typical IR illuminator designs (see below) - don't like the AC/DC adapters and POE.

1659834890784.png 1659834933630.png

And would like something that fits in an existing flood light fixture

1659835071018.png

Anyone familiar with these or know of a retailer where I could purchase individual bulbs?

1659835114442.png

850 nm: Infrared LED R30 Bulbs, Only 3 Watts, Indoor/Outdoor Spotlight & Floodlight
880 nm: LED Bulbs, R30, Infrared, E26 Base, 120VAC, Indoor/Outdoor Spotlight & Floodlight
940 nm: Infrared LED R30 Bulbs, Only 3 Watts, Indoor/Outdoor Spotlight & Floodlight

Thanks!
 

TonyR

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Any help? ==>> IR Illuminator for 120V bulb?

EDIT: More info 8/7 @ 0735CT: although not R30 bulbs, the U.S.- based eBay vendor does have different IR wavelengths. And for the record, E26 base (US) is interchangeable with the E27 (Europe/UK).
 
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ccb056

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Thanks Tony - I did see that one, but it looks like its rated for indoor use only.
 

TonyR

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Thanks Tony - I did see that one, but it looks like its rated for indoor use only.
True...but if push comes to shove and you don't find the ideal bulb.....Since they're LED they run cool so you could use outdoor/UV-rated silicone caulk on the front lens seam and the body seam, then use the big rubber washer that goes on the lamp's neck, install into the lamp holder pointed down. If under an eave, out of direct weather I'll bet it'll last a long time.

FWIW, my first set of Home Depot LED stake floods barely lasted a year lighting up my flag at night due to water intrusion. I bought another set, caulked them, they've lasted 4 years and counting.

But good luck finding the ones you want/need. :cool:
 

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FWIW, my first set of Home Depot LED stake floods barely lasted a year lighting up my flag at night due to water intrusion. I bought another set, caulked them, they've lasted 4 years and counting.
Trying these 12 volt AC HD stake floods for camera lighting. Side mounting on the house (8 feet up) and not ground mounting. Using a computer ATX power supply for the 12 volt line since the foods run on either AC or DC.

Hampton Bay LED Light.PNG

Is this the same one with water issues?
 

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I would suggest getting a real 12VDC supply, with a transformer, for a use like this.
Just curious as to the reason/s why.

Have a nice 12 VAC transformer that has 120/220 volt input with two 100 amp 12 VAC windings. Put it in a box, in a location that I would not forget, and now can not find it!! Perhaps efficiency wize it would be a better choice. However, it would loose in the pound per watt category!
 

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No, mine were 120VAC and from Home Depot; Plastic one here, and the metal one here.
Did look at those, but wanted low voltage with all of the associated voltage drop issues in place of 120 VAC. The low voltage lights are easier to install as running new 12-3 wire would be a major installation issue along with making sure all of the NEC rules were being followed. i.e. removing siding, wallboard, new holes through studs, etc.
 
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I just don't trust switching supplies as much as a transformer supply. Plus, there's the added isolation that a transformer provides. I was doing some re-arranging and consolidating in the basement last week and stumbled on a 30 amp, 12VDC regulated supply, a 15 amp 12VDC regulated supply and a 6 amp 12VDC regulated supply just sitting in boxes of electronics that I moved with. That 15 amp would do away with all the wall warts I use to power auxiliary IR plights and not even break a sweat. I would need to build a shelf for it behind the desk though and add a distribution panel.
 

TonyR

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Did look at those, but wanted low voltage with all of the associated voltage drop issues in place of 120 VAC. The low voltage lights are easier to install as running new 12-3 wire would be a major installation issue along with making sure all of the NEC rules were being followed. i.e. removing siding, wallboard, new holes through studs, etc.
I already had 120VAC for quartz lights out there 18 years ago. FWIW, the 7 watt LED's could be fed by 100 ft. of 18-2 and they'd still work, the voltage drop would be negligible. I'm feeding 2 (14 watts) with #14 about 20 ft. long.

But I get it regarding code with 120VAC. :cool:
 

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Power at 14 watts using a 120 VAC circuit would be around 100 ma. Essentially no voltage drop. That is the nice part of using LED lamps. My only issue is that I just keep on adding more LED lamps, thus the power bill keeps on slowly growing!

___

The complexity of a switching power supply is significantly greater than than that of a DC xformer supply. Both uses solid state devices of one type of another and both can fail.

Have no issue with trusting a switching PS for my application. Had never had a computer power supply fail. Would think that in the world there are more switching PS in use than xformer DC supplies. And most likely for one good reason - cost and weight.

The cost factor of free (old computer supply) vs the cost of a regulated with over voltage and short circuit protection for a xformer 12 VDC at 18 amp supply is another consideration.

Guess, if reliability were an issue, I would install an Edison battery or deep cycle battery with zero electronic devices. However, not necessary for a lighting circuit IMO. In a high security area with National ramifications than that would be another issue where the cost of providing the best possible has an unlimited budget.
 

TonyR

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Low voltage DC power supplies that are linear are simple but rely heavily on capacitors for filtering....and IMO, next to batteries, caps are the worst, most unreliable devices there are in electronic devices, especially when high temps are involved. Poorly designed linear power supplies where the cap contends with excessive and/or out-of-spec ripple current are particularly undependable.
 
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