How to connect dedicated computer connected to wired cameras to personal computer

wittaj

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If they are always on, will they get swarmed by bugs in the summer? Do these have IR or just these lights for this camera?
These full color type cameras do not see IR. The IR attracts bugs much more than these lights do, which is why many with cameras that see IR get external IR and not use the camera IR. Or leave floodlights on all night and not use the LED on the cameras.

You really won't know until you try and see which ones the bugs are attracted to. Most of mine are not a problem, but one camera is so I force it in color in the summer.
 

Cat5Hurricane

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I think you can find one cheaper.
I decided to go with 7 IPC-Color4K-X with a 3.6mm lens and 2 IPC-HFW5241E-Z12E for LPR. I was hoping you could help with two more questions:

  1. Does it matter with what POE switch I go with? Should there be a maximum total wattage or wattage per port? Should I be looking for one where each port is gigabit speed?
  2. From the Wiki (see below), should I get a 8 or 10 core processor? What is the minimum processor and memory you would recommend? Once I have that, I can narrow down computers.


    Add up the total megapixels per second (MP/s) you intend to run. Example: For two 8MP cameras each at 15 FPS you have 2 (cameras) * 8 (MP) * 15 (FPS) = 240 MP/s.

    Tip: 8 MP cameras are actually 8.3 megapixels. (2 * 8.3 * 15 = 249 MP/s)

    Then choose an Intel Desktop CPU with Quick Sync Video based on the number of cores and hyperthreading (HT) capability.

    Megapixels Per Second4 cores4 cores + HT6 cores6 cores + HT8 cores8 cores + HT10 cores + HT
    0-500 MP/sOKOKOKOKOKOKOK
    500-800 MP/sOKOKOKOKOKOK
    800-1100 MP/sOKOKOKOK
    1100-1500 MP/sOKOK


    For loads greater than 1500 MP/s, all bets are off. In my experience you will be running up against the limits of dual channel DDR4 memory bandwidth. Choose an HEDT platform and use quad channel memory. For the CPU, pick something near the top of this chart. Of course, you could also just use sub streams to reduce the video decoding load, or choose a different VMS software that has lighter system requirements than Blue Iris.
 

wittaj

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I would recommend you go with a POE+ switch as it will have enough juice and gives you room to expand if you get a PTZ down the road. 100MB is fine, but I go with GB just to have extra headroom. Most would recommend you get a quality name brand POE+ switch, maybe even a professional grade one from ebay. Others will say go with a cheaper one you can find on Amazon. I say go with what your budget allows. Just recognize a no-name switch may work for a long time, or it may poop out a year from now.

The wiki for a computer is a little dated and was written before the substreams option was available. A member here is running a 4th generation with 50 cameras at 30% CPU. So again, go with what your budget will allow. If you can afford a 7th generation or higher, then go for it; but if your budget only allows for a 4th to 6th generation CPU, it can handle it as well. Big key is make a desktop/tower type and not a laptop. And the CPU number shouldn't have a letter after it. So something like i7-4970 is good, but i7-4970T would be bad.
 

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This is very useful:
 

Cat5Hurricane

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I would recommend you go with a POE+ switch as it will have enough juice and gives you room to expand if you get a PTZ down the road. 100MB is fine, but I go with GB just to have extra headroom. Most would recommend you get a quality name brand POE+ switch, maybe even a professional grade one from ebay. Others will say go with a cheaper one you can find on Amazon. I say go with what your budget allows. Just recognize a no-name switch may work for a long time, or it may poop out a year from now.

The wiki for a computer is a little dated and was written before the substreams option was available. A member here is running a 4th generation with 50 cameras at 30% CPU. So again, go with what your budget will allow. If you can afford a 7th generation or higher, then go for it; but if your budget only allows for a 4th to 6th generation CPU, it can handle it as well. Big key is make a desktop/tower type and not a laptop. And the CPU number shouldn't have a letter after it. So something like i7-4970 is good, but i7-4970T would be bad.
Do you think this would be sufficent?

 

Cat5Hurricane

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That is more than sufficient!
I had one more thought. I will have all my cameras going to a junction box which I will feed into a PoE switch. In the same junction box, I have Cat5e going to each room that I have hardwired for internet for tv. For my office, I have two connections for a tv and my desktop. My PC system has a i7-6700 chip and 16GB RAM and is currently hardwired to the junction box. Could I just add a HDD (ordered WD Purple™ Surveillance Hard Drive - 18TB) to my current PC and load BI there, have the output from the POE switch that will be attached to all of the cameras come directly to my current PC via the switch's Uplink port which would connected to the output in the wall? If necessary, I could upgrade the processor. Would that be too much of a strain on my personal PC? I only use it primarily for internet and memory-light extensive games. I built this system 5 years ago and it is pretty modular and easy to upgrade if necessary.
 

wittaj

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You would want to either VLAN the cameras or dual NIC your BI machine so that the cameras do not talk to the internet.

The recommended method is to have the computer be the standalone "NVR" for BI and run nothing else on it.

Does that mean that nobody here doesn't multi-task a computer - no. So you could give it a go and monitor the system and see how it responds. If it isn't up to the task, then go ahead and offload it to another computer, or upgrade your current and use this one for BI.
 

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Echoing the comments from @wittaj, it should also be noted that if the camera switch has a dedicated uplink port, you might find it is only for uplinking to another switch vs to another network end device (your PC). It might be as simple as using a cross-over cable vs a patch cable. Results may vary, depending on switch manufacturer. With the scenario you last described, you would simply plug your PC in to one of the 'regular' ports on the camera PoE switch.
 

Cat5Hurricane

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I would recommend you go with a POE+ switch as it will have enough juice and gives you room to expand if you get a PTZ down the road. 100MB is fine, but I go with GB just to have extra headroom. Most would recommend you get a quality name brand POE+ switch, maybe even a professional grade one from ebay. Others will say go with a cheaper one you can find on Amazon. I say go with what your budget allows. Just recognize a no-name switch may work for a long time, or it may poop out a year from now.

The wiki for a computer is a little dated and was written before the substreams option was available. A member here is running a 4th generation with 50 cameras at 30% CPU. So again, go with what your budget will allow. If you can afford a 7th generation or higher, then go for it; but if your budget only allows for a 4th to 6th generation CPU, it can handle it as well. Big key is make a desktop/tower type and not a laptop. And the CPU number shouldn't have a letter after it. So something like i7-4970 is good, but i7-4970T would be bad.
I wanted to update you on what I went with and follow up with some installation questions.
Cameras: 7 IPC-Color4K-X with a 3.6mm lens and 2 IPC-HFW5241E-Z12E for LPR
Computer: Vostro 3681 Small Desktop; 10th Gen Intel(R)Core(TM) i5-10400 processor(6-Core, 12M Cache, 2.9GHz to 4.3GHz); 8GB, 8Gx1, DDR4, 2666MHz; 256GB M.2 PCIe NVMe Solid State Drive; ordered WD Purple™ Surveillance Hard Drive - 18TB and will add next week when it arrives.
Software: Blue Iris
Switch: Aumox 18-Port Gigabit Network Unmanaged Switch, 16-Port PoE with 2 Uplink Gigabit Ports, 250W Built-in Power ()
Junction Boxes: pfa130-e (ordered cable gland to be be able to protect and weatherproof Cat5e cable and should arrive tomorrow)

So some questions:
  1. I hooked one of the 4K cameras into the Cat5e cable but I got no activity from the camera. The switch was plugged in and should have been providing power (assuming builders labelled cables correctly). Uplink plugged into router (should this automatically connect my camera to the network?). Should I have heard the camera turning on when I connected cable? If the switch is plugged into the router, should I be able to connect to camera via gDMSS Plus on my phone by being able to find it on the device list?
  2. Assuming I can hook up cameras and view via my phone via gDMSS Plus, can I set everything up physically and then connect everything to the computer later (in a week or two) to record and modify settings? It would be nice to ensure everything is lined up correctly via my phone before dealing with the software side of everything. I will definitely utilize the Wiki when setting up computer and software. I ask because the instructions first start talking about network connections
  3. I read somewhere in this forum that the LPR cameras are best set at a target of 100-120 feet. Does that sound right?
  4. Cameras have input/output sound. Will that run through the Cat5e cable or do I somehow have to audio in and audio out cables. Assume those and the video cable are if you weren't going through Cat5e. Same for alarm I/O wires. Do I need to connect these to something or will it be dealt with via the Cat5e connection?
  5. Do you recommend glue'ing the junction box conduit when I connect the cable glands or can I just silicone tape the thread? Is the seal ring sufficient to weatherproof it or do I need to add silicone. I ordered these just because I can get them tomorrow via Amazon.
Thanks!!
 

wittaj

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Answers to your questions:

  1. I hooked one of the 4K cameras into the Cat5e cable but I got no activity from the camera. The switch was plugged in and should have been providing power (assuming builders labelled cables correctly). Uplink plugged into router (should this automatically connect my camera to the network?). Should I have heard the camera turning on when I connected cable? If the switch is plugged into the router, should I be able to connect to camera via gDMSS Plus on my phone by being able to find it on the device list? This camera doesn't have an IR filter, so you won't hear anything. Was the switch providing power to any thing else (and confirming it is a POE switch?)
  2. Assuming I can hook up cameras and view via my phone via gDMSS Plus, can I set everything up physically and then connect everything to the computer later (in a week or two) to record and modify settings? It would be nice to ensure everything is lined up correctly via my phone before dealing with the software side of everything. I will definitely utilize the Wiki when setting up computer and software. I ask because the instructions first start talking about network connections Most of us do not set the camera up that way.
    1. Your internal IP address (LAN) is probably different than the default IP address of the Dahua OEM cams. The default IP address for Dahua cams is 192.168.1.108.

      The easiest way is to take a laptop (if it has an ethernet port) or a tower and turn off wifi and connect the camera cable to the laptop (obviously you need power so if it is on a POE switch then connect a cable from the switch to the computer).

      Then go into ethernet settings and manually change the IP address of the laptop to 192.168.1.100.

      Then go to a browser and type in 192.168.1.108 (default IP address of Dahua cameras) and you will then access the camera.

      Then change the camera to the IP address range of your home network (using the IPv4 settings), but have the last digits something not already assigned.

      Then go back into ethernet settings and change the computer IP address back to what it was previously (probably DHCP)

      Then replug in everything like it was and proceed from there.

      Or download Dahua toolbox and run the batch config tool where you can Initialize the camera and change it's IP, but most of us do what I mentioned.
  3. I read somewhere in this forum that the LPR cameras are best set at a target of 100-120 feet. Does that sound right? With the Z12E it can be anywhere from 40 feet to 200+ feet. The goal is to get as straight as shot as possible at the plate.
  4. Cameras have input/output sound. Will that run through the Cat5e cable or do I somehow have to audio in and audio out cables. Assume those and the video cable are if you weren't going through Cat5e. Same for alarm I/O wires. Do I need to connect these to something or will it be dealt with via the Cat5e connection? The audio will go thru the ethernet cable. Those additional cables on the camera are if you want to add external. So unless you are adding a mic or speaker or an alarm I/O, you can simply leave those alone.
  5. Do you recommend glue'ing the junction box conduit when I connect the cable glands or can I just silicone tape the thread? Is the seal ring sufficient to weatherproof it or do I need to add silicone. I ordered these just because I can get them tomorrow via Amazon. That is up to you. Do make sure you use dielectric grease and some waterproofing tape on the ethernet to camera connection. Those waterproof pieces provided won't cut it.
 

Cat5Hurricane

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Answers to your questions:

  1. I hooked one of the 4K cameras into the Cat5e cable but I got no activity from the camera. The switch was plugged in and should have been providing power (assuming builders labelled cables correctly). Uplink plugged into router (should this automatically connect my camera to the network?). Should I have heard the camera turning on when I connected cable? If the switch is plugged into the router, should I be able to connect to camera via gDMSS Plus on my phone by being able to find it on the device list? This camera doesn't have an IR filter, so you won't hear anything. Was the switch providing power to any thing else (and confirming it is a POE switch?)
  2. Assuming I can hook up cameras and view via my phone via gDMSS Plus, can I set everything up physically and then connect everything to the computer later (in a week or two) to record and modify settings? It would be nice to ensure everything is lined up correctly via my phone before dealing with the software side of everything. I will definitely utilize the Wiki when setting up computer and software. I ask because the instructions first start talking about network connections Most of us do not set the camera up that way.
    1. Your internal IP address (LAN) is probably different than the default IP address of the Dahua OEM cams. The default IP address for Dahua cams is 192.168.1.108.

      The easiest way is to take a laptop (if it has an ethernet port) or a tower and turn off wifi and connect the camera cable to the laptop (obviously you need power so if it is on a POE switch then connect a cable from the switch to the computer).

      Then go into ethernet settings and manually change the IP address of the laptop to 192.168.1.100.

      Then go to a browser and type in 192.168.1.108 (default IP address of Dahua cameras) and you will then access the camera.

      Then change the camera to the IP address range of your home network (using the IPv4 settings), but have the last digits something not already assigned.

      Then go back into ethernet settings and change the computer IP address back to what it was previously (probably DHCP)

      Then replug in everything like it was and proceed from there.

      Or download Dahua toolbox and run the batch config tool where you can Initialize the camera and change it's IP, but most of us do what I mentioned.
  3. I read somewhere in this forum that the LPR cameras are best set at a target of 100-120 feet. Does that sound right? With the Z12E it can be anywhere from 40 feet to 200+ feet. The goal is to get as straight as shot as possible at the plate.
  4. Cameras have input/output sound. Will that run through the Cat5e cable or do I somehow have to audio in and audio out cables. Assume those and the video cable are if you weren't going through Cat5e. Same for alarm I/O wires. Do I need to connect these to something or will it be dealt with via the Cat5e connection? The audio will go thru the ethernet cable. Those additional cables on the camera are if you want to add external. So unless you are adding a mic or speaker or an alarm I/O, you can simply leave those alone.
  5. Do you recommend glue'ing the junction box conduit when I connect the cable glands or can I just silicone tape the thread? Is the seal ring sufficient to weatherproof it or do I need to add silicone. I ordered these just because I can get them tomorrow via Amazon. That is up to you. Do make sure you use dielectric grease and some waterproofing tape on the ethernet to camera connection. Those waterproof pieces provided won't cut it.
  1. This camera doesn't have an IR filter, so you won't hear anything. Was the switch providing power to any thing else (and confirming it is a POE switch?).
    1. That is the hope. I only plugged in one of the cables to the switch. It is possible it was labelled wrong by the builders. I can plug them all in tomorrow.
  2. Most of us do not set the camera up that way. Your internal IP address (LAN) is probably different than the default IP address of the Dahua OEM cams. The default IP address for Dahua cams is 192.168.1.108.

    The easiest way is to take a laptop (if it has an ethernet port) or a tower and turn off wifi and connect the camera cable to the laptop (obviously you need power so if it is on a POE switch then connect a cable from the switch to the computer).

    Then go into ethernet settings and manually change the IP address of the laptop to 192.168.1.100.

    Then go to a browser and type in 192.168.1.108 (default IP address of Dahua cameras) and you will then access the camera.

    Then change the camera to the IP address range of your home network (using the IPv4 settings), but have the last digits something not already assigned.

    Then go back into ethernet settings and change the computer IP address back to what it was previously (probably DHCP)

    Then replug in everything like it was and proceed from there.

    Or download Dahua toolbox and run the batch config tool where you can Initialize the camera and change it's IP, but most of us do what I mentioned.
    1. Neither me or my kids' laptop have an ethernet port. I can run a long cable to my current laptop to test. The issue is when I am placing the camera, I want to be able to see exactly what it is seeing in real time without having to walk back inside and looking at the monitor so I can fine tune any directional changes.
  3. With the Z12E it can be anywhere from 40 feet to 200+ feet. The goal is to get as straight as shot as possible at the plate.
    1. Thanks!
  4. The audio will go thru the ethernet cable. Those additional cables on the camera are if you want to add external. So unless you are adding a mic or speaker or an alarm I/O, you can simply leave those alone.
    1. Thanks. 4K camera appears to have internal speaker.
  5. That is up to you. Do make sure you use dielectric grease and some waterproofing tape on the ethernet to camera connection. Those waterproof pieces provided won't cut it.
    1. I would not have done that and hence would have had to go back and re-do. Thanks for the suggestion!!
 

wittaj

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Builders never mislabel LOL.

The point of changing the IP address of the camera is so that you can find it and then be able to pull it up on another device.

These cameras all come with the same IP address of 192.168.1.108 and if you hang them all up and plug in at the same time, you are screwed LOL.

You should bench test them first and set up the IP address for each camera before hanging it up. Ideally you should also temp rig it outside to make sure it doesn't need adjustment - you may or may not have that ability since the cables are already ran. So you should test each camera to your computer with an ethernet port and set each camera IP up first.

Make sure you use Internet Explorer to initialize and set up each camera. Not Edge, not Chrome with the IE extension, but plain ole Explorer baked into Win 10.

Yes the 4K has an internal speaker. It is louder than most cameras since the camera is bigger.
 
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I always "bench test" every camera. That let's me set the IP address and other network information the way I want it. It also lets me have the camera connected right there in front of me so I can see what's going on and not worry about "is it the right cable I just plugged in to?". You can also set all the basic parameters, frame rate, i frame rate, bit rate, encoding, brightness, contrast and on and on, right then and there. They'll probably need tweaking once installed, but by doing it this way you're confirming the functionality of the camera rather than guessing with cables. All I do is plug into the PoE switch with a short cable, bring up the camera GUI and set the login credentials. From there you can access all the settings of the camera. Like wittaj says, use Internet Explorer. Just type "explorer" (no quotes) into the search bar of Win10.
 

Cat5Hurricane

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Builders never mislabel LOL.

The point of changing the IP address of the camera is so that you can find it and then be able to pull it up on another device.

These cameras all come with the same IP address of 192.168.1.108 and if you hang them all up and plug in at the same time, you are screwed LOL.

You should bench test them first and set up the IP address for each camera before hanging it up. Ideally you should also temp rig it outside to make sure it doesn't need adjustment - you may or may not have that ability since the cables are already ran. So you should test each camera to your computer with an ethernet port and set each camera IP up first.

Make sure you use Internet Explorer to initialize and set up each camera. Not Edge, not Chrome with the IE extension, but plain ole Explorer baked into Win 10.

Yes the 4K has an internal speaker. It is louder than most cameras since the camera is bigger.
You are the absolute best! Yes, I would have hung one to feel comfortable and then tried to hang the rest screwing myself in the process. lol! I will definitely follow your advice and it makes sense that is why the directions focused on that first instead of actually hanging them. Just felt pressured to get started this weekend because it was 72 today. May not see that again for months. But yes, I can set up everything in my office and connect once confirmed and address updated.

At least I got my surround sound unboxed and set up and ceiling speakers hung successfully. That was my small win for the weekend.
 

Cat5Hurricane

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I always "bench test" every camera. That let's me set the IP address and other network information the way I want it. It also lets me have the camera connected right there in front of me so I can see what's going on and not worry about "is it the right cable I just plugged in to?". You can also set all the basic parameters, frame rate, i frame rate, bit rate, encoding, brightness, contrast and on and on, right then and there. They'll probably need tweaking once installed, but by doing it this way you're confirming the functionality of the camera rather than guessing with cables. All I do is plug into the PoE switch with a short cable, bring up the camera GUI and set the login credentials. From there you can access all the settings of the camera. Like wittaj says, use Internet Explorer. Just type "explorer" (no quotes) into the search bar of Win10.
Thanks for confirming his advice. Yes, I will do it this way.
 

wittaj

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I don't know if the builder provided the switch or if you did, but certainly make sure it is POE and is capable of powering your 9 cameras!

Not much worse than hooking everything up and finding out they gave you a switch that is not POE!
 

Cat5Hurricane

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I don't know if the builder provided the switch or if you did, but certainly make sure it is POE and is capable of powering your 9 cameras!

Not much worse than hooking everything up and finding out they gave you a switch that is not POE!
No I got it. I had to get one for all of my cable drops. Since the reviews were high and it powers all at gigabit speed, I got another for the cameras.

Looking at the wiki, there is so much related to computer settings. Do I literally do all or just pay attention to certain ones? Which are the most critical when setting things up?

For instance, if I do a dual NIC, do I need 2 ethernet ports? And if I live in a safe community with all the cameras being outside, do I really need to worry about my system being hacked? I understand it is more secure but is it more than I need?

Also, since the camera computer will have no monitor after I set it up, what program do you recommend for logging into the cameras on the system or getting into Blue Iris?
 
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The most important thing to do is to use sub streams. That will cut the load on the CPU dramatically. Doing all the things listed is a best practice to make the system run as efficiently as possible.

Hacking isn't done by your neighbors, it's done by yahoos anywhere in the world, Eastern Europe is a pretty busy home for hackers for example. They will come in via your internet connection not by physically attaching a PC to your network.

Windows Pro has a remote control program baked in. Alternately there are other remote desktop programs available that are less resource intensive. In either case there will be a slower response at the remote end computer. Something to be aware of, not a deal breaker.
 
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