Hit and Miss connecting to server with BI or UI3 App

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Greetings everyone, it seems my Android BI App or UI3 is hit and miss, mostly miss, not being able to connect to the server. Works fine on the LAN and I found if I run through to the end "Finish" with Remote access Wizard setup getting all Green checks. After, I'm able to connect with either App using cell data WAM connection.
Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
 

fenderman

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Greetings everyone, it seems my Android BI App or UI3 is hit and miss, mostly miss, not being able to connect to the server. Works fine on the LAN and I found if I run through to the end "Finish" with Remote access Wizard setup getting all Green checks. After, I'm able to connect with either App using cell data WAM connection.
Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
It sounds like the local IP address of your blue iris server might be changing. You need you either need to set a static IP address or reserve the IP address in your DHCP server. The easiest would be to reserve the dhcp address.
 
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Thanks for the help and quick response! being very new at this, is there a way you can tell if this is the case? it seems the IP is the same but not 100% sure or a way when its not working. I did check my ASUS router and found DHCP Server to manually add with a drop down and select the BI server computer, does that sound correct? sorry for the lack on knowledge in this area.
 

fenderman

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Thanks for the help and quick response! being very new at this, is there a way you can tell if this is the case? it seems the IP is the same but not 100% sure or a way when its not working. I did check my ASUS router and found DHCP Server to manually add with a drop down and select the BI server computer, does that sound correct? sorry for the lack on knowledge in this area.
Yes in the asus config page you need to add it then hit apply as well
 

The Automation Guy

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In my humble opinion, setting each device up to use DHCP, but manually reserving static IP addresses for your devices in your router is the best method to handle a residential network.

Here is my thoughts on it:
- Having DHCP assigned in each individual device is great when there is an issue and you want to troubleshoot that device. You can unplug it from the network and plug it into a test environment and it will connect just fine.
- Having static (or reserved) IP addresses for each device is really critical for a stable network environment where devices need to communicate with other devices.
- Setting up DHCP in the individual devices, but reserving static IP addresses in the router, gives you the best of both worlds. Of course it requires a little time to reserve the addresses in the router, but I find this method works best for me.

Now of course this won't work on a larger scale because of the time it takes to set up, but for the average residential setting it can definitely work.
 

tech_junkie

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maybe you should try using a DNS server that would be typically common to the phone and internet system:
Primary DNS : 8.8.8.8 Secondary DNS: 8.8.4.4 in both computer and router.

But that is not going to stop the outside IP address changing on you if that is the real problem.
 

Pentagano

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In my humble opinion, setting each device up to use DHCP, but manually reserving static IP addresses for your devices in your router is the best method to handle a residential network.

Here is my thoughts on it:
  • Having DHCP assigned in each individual device is great when there is an issue and you want to troubleshoot that device. You can unplug it from the network and plug it into a test environment and it will connect just fine.
  • Having static (or reserved) IP addresses for each device is really critical for a stable network environment where devices need to communicate with other devices.
  • Setting up DHCP in the individual devices, but reserving static IP addresses in the router, gives you the best of both worlds. Of course it requires a little time to reserve the addresses in the router, but I find this method works best for me.

Now of course this won't work on a larger scale because of the time it takes to set up, but for the average residential setting it can definitely work.
I think I did the 3rd option you stated on my BI pc. dhcp static on the machine and in the router, been a while so would need to check

Update: just checked no I have it set up as automatic for the IPv4 properties. Think I set that up as static in my old dell I had though as that had an issue
 

Twister

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Just a penny thought, many routers will reserve LAN IP if you set a device as static. I do it with my Motorola router all the time. Very easy for home configuration. Set my NVR static and on the dhcp list in the router shows as reserved with no further headaches.
 
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