Hikvision how to set up another computer on the same network to see the cameras?

JulieD

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Hi,
A local IT business owner fairly recently installed 5 Hikvision cameras at my work place through the network switch recording to and running camera software from the work server.

He also set up the boss’s phone with an app she can see them on. He put a monitor next to the server where you can see all the camera feeds at once and check past recordings.
The monitor is useless in there since it's basically a closet and both server and monitor are just above floor level. I'm not at work at the moment but I'll check what software is running on there on Monday.

Then the guy who installed them quit working in IT and will no longer support them. Now the boss wants a monitor set up in the office to see the camera feed. I presume she wants to see all 5 at once like on the server monitor, not 1 at a time through a browser. The boss asked me to do it. There are cat5 cable jacks in the office I can hook a PC into, and good wifi no issue there.
I have been given 3 passwords to login with.

What is the easiest way to accomplish this with the present set up?
Thank you for any advice.
 

pozzello

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whatever NVR software is running on your 'work server' probably has a web UI to see camera feeds from any browser on the network, but would need to know exactly what that is...
 

JulieD

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I'll find that out tomorrow. I was hoping for something very simple like that. Can you generally see all 5 on the same tab or will it be one camera per tab? I reckon they're going to want to see all 5 on one monitor at the same time. I do remember the software has a 9 click or touch key code thingy because I was given the shape as a login...

and thanks so much for the quick response! I'd assume it's standard hikvision software...
 

looney2ns

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Yes, you typically can see all the cameras at once on the screen and choose one camera to enlarge the view if you wish. We will need to know (if possible) what brand and model number of the server. Don't use Wifi, if it can be avoided, it's not designed to handle continuous streams like security cams.
 

JulieD

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That would be perfect. I'll find out what camera software is running on the server and what the server is. No problem with a cat5 jack available.
Can really low end PC handle that? There's an extra ancient one kicking around and also an old laptop we could hook a monitor to.
 

looney2ns

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That would be perfect. I'll find out what camera software is running on the server and what the server is. No problem with a cat5 jack available.
Can really low end PC handle that? There's an extra ancient one kicking around and also an old laptop we could hook a monitor to.
I wouldn't use the laptop, in general they are not powerful enough to continuous video viewing.
It would depend on how low end, probably would handle it, but it depends on the CPU.
 

pb&j

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If all that is needed is a "VIEW ONLY" monitor then you may not need a pc at all. My HIK NVR has dual HDMI out and I've been using a HDMI extender over cat5 to watch the live the video feeds from a monitor in the master bedroom. The other HDMI connects to the display at the NVR and both are able to run simultaneously. I put a picture of what I am using and the remote monitor view. Been using this for about 4 months with no issues at all. There is a max cat5 run length 165 feet - mine is about 100 feet. You said the office prewired so you can just plug into one of those mine is plugged into the prewired cat 5e outlet the room.
 

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JulieD

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That's very cool. I didn’t know there was such a thing as hdmi over Ethernet!
If a laptop won’t handle it, it's unlikely the old pc would. I might have to put it on the office secretary's i5 NUC then. Maybe try it out on the laptop first until I know what I'm doing.
 

JulieD

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Here's an idea! We have an iPad and a chromebook at work, we could put an app on one of those? Not a great iPad mind you... an older mini.
pretty sure we have no spare hdmi monitors. Most of the gear is old, the newest is the office NUC and the boss's lease laptop which does I think have a video card.
 

JulieD

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Ok update, it has an NVR and hdmi on the back, currently hooked up to a vga monitor via vga port.
 
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looney2ns

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That is a Hikvision NVR.
Try this, click on Network on that screen, get the IP address of the NVR make note of it. You want the WAN IP.
Go to another computer on the network, using Internet Explorer, navigate to the noted IP address with the browser, you should be able to access the nvr and view the cams with some trial and error.
More info here: Embedded Plug & Play NVR
 

JulieD

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Hi, can't find the WAN listed but did log in via browser to the NVR.
Thanks for the link, will check it out.
 
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JulieD

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An update: viewing the images from the nvr on the LAN over Ethernet on pale moon web browser 64 bit on a win 10 business class laptop on sub stream setting. Working well so far. Did it that way to avoid the expense of a video to Ethernet adapter even though that was a great idea. The laptop wasn’t in use anyway.

I'm not familiar with NVRs. If I assign the NVR a static ip on the LAN can I leave the cameras' ips as they are? I'd rather not have to assign each camera one too.

Thank you!
 

SpacemanSpiff

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An update: viewing the images from the nvr on the LAN over Ethernet on pale moon web browser 64 bit on a win 10 business class laptop on sub stream setting. Working well so far. Did it that way to avoid the expense of a video to Ethernet adapter even though that was a great idea. The laptop wasn’t in use anyway.

I'm not familiar with NVRs. If I assign the NVR a static ip on the LAN can I leave the cameras' ips as they are? I'd rather not have to assign each camera one too.

Thank you!
You can (should) set a static IP to the NVR LAN, and as long as it (IP) is on the same network/subnet as the cameras, it should be fine. You should also consider setting static IP's on cameras, if they are not static already. Will make things easier if you ever need to troubleshoot connectivity issues. If they are receiving IPs from an office DHCP server, you can pre-define (reserve) their IPs using their MAC address
 

JulieD

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You can (should) set a static IP to the NVR LAN, and as long as it (IP) is on the same network/subnet as the cameras, it should be fine. You should also consider setting static IP's on cameras, if they are not static already. Will make things easier if you ever need to troubleshoot connectivity issues. If they are receiving IPs from an office DHCP server, you can pre-define (reserve) their IPs using their MAC address
Thanks for the help Spaceman. :) They are receiving IPs from a server.

Should I assign the NVR the static IP via the reservation/MAC address on our DHCP server or set it on the NVR itself or both?
Also, I've always been a bit confused as to whether I can reserve an IP via MAC that is within the DHCP range or if it must be outside the range but on the same network/subnet. Our DHCP range is below:

Start:Stop:
192.168.0.51192.168.0.249
255.255.255.0

I have a PC assigned to 192.168.0.50 via MAC/reservation.
I was thinking of setting the NVR to 192.168.0.49.
And the cameras to 48, 47, etc.

Cheers!
 
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JulieD

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To answer my own question, you can set the reservation and don't have to change the IP on the NVR.
 

SpacemanSpiff

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To answer my own question, you can set the reservation and don't have to change the IP on the NVR.
Correct, either set the reservation on the DHCP server -OR- set the static IP on the NVR settings. No need to do both. Reservations can be quite convenient.

Now.. If you set a reservation, the trick is to remember you did so. Several times it has caused me some confusion when troubleshooting connectivity issues with <insert network device here> .
 

JulieD

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Correct, either set the reservation on the DHCP server -OR- set the static IP on the NVR settings. No need to do both. Reservations can be quite convenient.

Now.. If you set a reservation, the trick is to remember you did so. Several times it has caused me some confusion when troubleshooting connectivity issues with <insert network device here> .
:) I both made a note of it and put a good descriptive phrase on the reservation setting.
 

TonyR

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FWIW, some wireless router/modem combos furnished by AT&T, CenturyLink, etc. do not have a way to create reservations for IP addresses.
No worries, just assign static IP addresses as you like to your devices using a range that is OUTSIDE of the router's DHCP pool.

In the case of a router like @JulieD 's in post #15, one could change the range of the DHCP pool from .51 => .249 over to .51 => .200, leaving over 149 IP's for the DHCP pool and over 50 IP's outside the DHCP pool for you to assign to static devices.:cool:
 
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