Adding smoke detectors to camera installation

gabtrillz

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Hi everyone,

I am planning the camera installation for a new building, I have already thought of the cameras, I will install 20 cameras of the dahua 5442 series per floor, one switch per floor and a computer with BI to control all of them.

I have two doubts:

Is it possible to add a second computer to the network, also with Blue Iris, but with access to 5 cameras only ?
The idea is that the manager will have access to all the cameras in the main office. But a worker in another room could see 5 of those cameras.

Another question. I am going to add smoke detectors and I was wondering if there are POE detectors that could be connected to BI. In this way the installation would be super easy. But I have not found anything about it.
I have seen detectors which only work over Wi-Fi. Well, we will have Wi-Fi in the building, but I don't know if it's a good idea. Wifi AP can create multiple networks, and I could create an exclusive network for the detectors.
Then there are other sensors that work at frequencies like 433mhz to communicate with a base. And this base is the one that can have network cable. Dahua has this system.
I am completely lost with this. I asked my electrician and he told me to put wifi detectors, just for simplicity. I prefer to discuss it here before making any decision.

Thank you very much in advance for any opinion or advice.
 

TonyR

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Is it possible to add a second computer to the network, also with Blue Iris, but with access to 5 cameras only ?
The idea is that the manager will have access to all the cameras in the main office. But a worker in another room could see 5 of those cameras.
You can create a user with password, say "worker" that can only view the 5 cameras you want him to see which are assigned to a specific group, that group perhaps named "FiveCams".

The user "manager" would have no restrictions on which cameras he can view, only the "worker".

Both users would log into the same, single Blue Iris server over the LAN and access BI's built-in webserver, called "UI3".
 

eggsan

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for security reasons, I will recommend connecting the smoke sensors in a separate network, using old-school wired powered into the alarm system. Will never trust using a wifi communication for such events.
 

Griswalduk

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Without knowing the background, size of the building or its purpose I'd say for health and safety reasons alone the 2 systems should most definitely be kept separate.

A fire alarm system is an early warning system to get people out and needs to be bomb proof, If anything happens in years to come you will be held responsible if you design / install it etc. By all means design and install the cctv system but leave fire safety to the experts.

It's not somewhere to cut corners.
 

Teken

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I have to affirm what others above have stated as to the best path to follow regarding a health and safety device. Having said that if the primary system is hardwired and monitored by a CS. If there are physical restrictions as it relates to wiring more smoke detectors the use of RF detectors is good method to add layering to an existing system.

While also providing isolation and electrical protection from surge & lightning events.

Depending upon where you reside in the world the two are a requirement to allow a measure of fail over and protection of the smoke detection grid. I can personally vouch to the importance of having the two systems in place as in the early 2000's a two week boomer (Lightning Event) came through our city.

Unbeknownst to me at that time several hardwired detectors and its monitoring relay was damaged. In that early period I was still slowly rolling out my tiered SPD protection system. The only reason I found out there was a problem with the detector(s) is from the monthly fire checks. One unit was slow to react to the smoke check, while the other did not sound off when the test button was pressed.

The fire relay that connects to the security alarm panel was (slow / latched) and caused all kinds of erratic behavior to the panel. Truth be told I should have paid more attention to the security logs as the system did in fact detect a fault but I ignored it thinking it was due to my endless upgrades and power cycle testing. :facepalm: :banghead:
 

gabtrillz

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You can create a user with password, say "worker" that can only view the 5 cameras you want him to see which are assigned to a specific group, that group perhaps named "FiveCams".

The user "manager" would have no restrictions on which cameras he can view, only the "worker".

Both users would log into the same, single Blue Iris server over the LAN and access BI's built-in webserver, called "UI3".
Cool, perfect
Thank you
 

gabtrillz

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for security reasons, I will recommend connecting the smoke sensors in a separate network, using old-school wired powered into the alarm system. Will never trust using a wifi communication for such events.
Without knowing the background, size of the building or its purpose I'd say for health and safety reasons alone the 2 systems should most definitely be kept separate.

A fire alarm system is an early warning system to get people out and needs to be bomb proof, If anything happens in years to come you will be held responsible if you design / install it etc. By all means design and install the cctv system but leave fire safety to the experts.

It's not somewhere to cut corners.
Very well noted. Thanks
 

gabtrillz

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I have to affirm what others above have stated as to the best path to follow regarding a health and safety device. Having said that if the primary system is hardwired and monitored by a CS. If there are physical restrictions as it relates to wiring more smoke detectors the use of RF detectors is good method to add layering to an existing system.

While also providing isolation and electrical protection from surge & lightning events.

Depending upon where you reside in the world the two are a requirement to allow a measure of fail over and protection of the smoke detection grid. I can personally vouch to the importance of having the two systems in place as in the early 2000's a two week boomer (Lightning Event) came through our city.

Unbeknownst to me at that time several hardwired detectors and its monitoring relay was damaged. In that early period I was still slowly rolling out my tiered SPD protection system. The only reason I found out there was a problem with the detector(s) is from the monthly fire checks. One unit was slow to react to the smoke check, while the other did not sound off when the test button was pressed.

The fire relay that connects to the security alarm panel was (slow / latched) and caused all kinds of erratic behavior to the panel. Truth be told I should have paid more attention to the security logs as the system did in fact detect a fault but I ignored it thinking it was due to my endless upgrades and power cycle testing. :facepalm: :banghead:
Really interesting, thanks for the info.
Right now, I still have the option of running conduit for a wired system, or save that cost and use the rf option. With your experience, what modern equipment would you recommend me?

Anyway, I have already spoken with the company that will make the installation of the fire extinguishers, and I will meet them next week to see the options for the smoke detectors.
 

Teken

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System Sensor & Fire Lite are the first two that come to mind . . .
 
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